Nebraska’s Nicest Nine

Nebraska’s Nicest Nine

A couple years ago, Steve and I took off on a 6-day journey to find out for ourselves if our home state lives up to its then new slogan, “Nebraska Nice.”

We wrote about some of the nicest things we saw — calling them  our 2014 “Nebraska’s Nicest Nine.”  The list was compiled from the places we traveled that summer on our 1,260-mile journey that took us west to North Platte, then off I-80 around Lake McConaughy to Alliance, then to Scottsbluff/Gering, up to Chadron, across Highway 20 to Valentine, and Norfolk, then down through Columbus to home.

These nine are the nicest sites, attractions, and people we found on that particular trip off the beaten path–a place definitely worth going.

Our Nebraska’s Nicest Nine:

#9 – Cody Park –  This unique park in North Platte was filled with a wide variety of animals (including white peacocks), a carousel, ice cream shop, and lots of smiling faces.

#8- Wildflowers and prairie grasses We were stunned (and so were our sinuses) by the incredible displays of purple and gold wildflowers and the prairie grasses throughout the state.

#7 – Chimney Rock and Scottsbluff Monument No list of Nebraska’s best would be complete without these two historic landmarks. They never disappoint.

postcardjar.com#6 – A kiss on the butte – Long and empty roads, rolling Sandhills, and an absence of cell phone coverage brought on the romance, and yes, a kiss on the butte.

#5 – Ashfall Fossil Beds State Historical Park  Sadly, one of the least known attractions in Nebraska. This place is amazing and unlike any other fossil bed site in the world.

#4 – Circle C in Cody Students in this small town (that refuses to die) built a a straw-bale building and now run a supermarket – the first here in more than a decade.

#3 – Neon Bar and Grill – Perfectly seasoned and grilled steaks and excellent service earned this restaraunt a place in our Top 9. The fact that it was (by far) the cleanest restaurant in which we ate on our trip, moved it all the way up to #3.

#2 – Toadstool Geologic Park – There’s nothing like Toadstool anywhere else in Nebraska (or likely the world). It is located 19 miles from Crawford in the far northwest part of the state — but feels like you’re on the moon.

#1 – Innkeeper Jeanne Goetzinger –  We saw a lot of great attractions on our trip. But honestly, nothing compared to the people we met along the way. We found that it is people like Jeanne, that make Nebraska especially “nice.”

Nebraska’s Nicest Honorable Mention:

Concert at Wild West Rodeo Arena in North Platte; Photo by Ann Teget for postcardjar.comFront Street in Ogallala; Golden Spike Tower and visitor center in North Platte; Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron; Higgins Memorial in Columbus; Lake McConaughy; Motel Raine in Valentine; North Platte Hampton Inn; Ole’s Big Game Bar and Grill in Paxton; The Sand Bar and Grill in Norfolk; Smith Falls; Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge near Valentine.

Not so nice? You be the judge. Carhenge. We spent about 15 minutes at this Stonehenge replica made of old cars near Alliance. On our way back to the car, I asked Steve what he thought. He said, “It was everything I imagined and less. Much less.” Personally, I thought it was pretty cool.

What do you think? What are the nicest things you’ve seen in Nebraska or your home state? Let us know in the comment section below. We’d love to hear from you.

Thanks, Jim and Kelly

Thanks, Jim and Kelly

Our friends and neighbors, Jim and Kelly, celebrated their 34th wedding anniversary this summer by traveling back to their original honeymoon destination — The Black Hills of South Dakota.

We were delighted that they would take time out of their anniversary trip to send us a postcard — and a fancy one, at that. When it arrived in our post office box, we quickly noticed something different about this one. The postcard featured photos the couple took on their vacation, and the note on back was personalized, but not hand-written. And, there was no stamp.

With little closer look (and a phone call from Kelly)  I realized they had used a phone app called Touchnote to design and send the postcard. With Touchnote, you just download the app on your mobile phone, upload some pictures, and plug in an address. Then, for $1.99, the postcard is mailed to the recipient. That’s it. Super easy to use and a great alternative to stopping at a gift shop, looking for a place to buy a stamp, and finding a post office or drop box.

It was great to see photos from Jim and Kelly’s return visit to Mount Rushmore and see the the progress of the Crazy Horse Memorial. They even explored two new places they’d never seen in western Nebraska — Chimney Rock and the infamous Carhenge. Kelly even shared a couple snapshots from their honeymoon back in 1981 when they visited Reptile Gardens, another Black Hills favorite.

Kelly and Jim on the giant tortoises at Reptile Gardens near Rapid City, South Dakota, in 1981.

Thanks again for sending us a postcard, Jim and Kelly, and congratulations on 34 years of marriage. We wish you many more years of great adventures together!

[well]When you’re traveling next, be sure to send us a postcard at Postcard Jar, P.O. Box 334, Crete, NE 68333. We’d love to hear from you![/well]

Nebraska’s Nicest Nine Recap

Nebraska’s Nicest Nine Recap

Earlier this summer, Steve and I took off on a 6-day journey to find out for ourselves if our home state lives up to its new slogan, “Nebraska Nice.”

We wrote about some of the nicest things we saw — calling them  our 2014 “Nebraska’s Nicest Nine.”  The list was compiled from the places we traveled this summer on our 1,260-mile journey that took us west to North Platte, then off I-80 around Lake McConaughy to Alliance, then to Scottsbluff/Gering, up to Chadron, across Highway 20 to Valentine, and Norfolk, then down through Columbus to home.

These nine are the nicest sites, attractions, and people we found on this particular trip off the beaten path–a place definitely worth going.

Our 2014 Nebraska’s Nicest Nine:

#9 – Cody Park –  This unique park in North Platte was filled with a wide variety of animals (including white peacocks), a carousel, ice cream shop, and lots of smiling faces.

#8- Wildflowers and prairie grasses We were stunned (and so were our sinuses) by the incredible displays of purple and gold wildflowers and the prairie grasses throughout the state.

#7 – Chimney Rock and Scottsbluff Monument No list of Nebraska’s best would be complete without these two historic landmarks. They never disappoint.

postcardjar.com#6 – A kiss on the butte – Long and empty roads, rolling Sandhills, and an absence of cell phone coverage brought on the romance, and yes, a kiss on the butte.

#5 – Ashfall Fossil Beds State Historical Park  Sadly, one of the least known attractions in Nebraska. This place is amazing and unlike any other fossil bed site in the world.

#4 – Circle C in Cody Students in this small town (that refuses to die) built a a straw-bale building and now run a supermarket – the first here in more than a decade.

#3 – Neon Bar and Grill – Perfectly seasoned and grilled steaks and excellent service earned this restaraunt a place in our Top 9. The fact that it was (by far) the cleanest restaurant in which we ate on our trip, moved it all the way up to #3.

#2 – Toadstool Geologic Park – There’s nothing like Toadstool anywhere else in Nebraska (or likely the world). It is located 19 miles from Crawford in the far northwest part of the state — but feels like you’re on the moon.

#1 – Innkeeper Jeanne Goetzinger –  We saw a lot of great attractions on our trip. But honestly, nothing compared to the people we met along the way. We found that it is people like Jeanne, that make Nebraska especially “nice.”

 

2014 Nebraska’s Nicest Honorable Mention:

Concert at Wild West Rodeo Arena in North Platte; Photo by Ann Teget for postcardjar.comFront Street in Ogallala; Golden Spike Tower and visitor center in North Platte; Museum of the Fur Trade in Chadron; Higgins Memorial in Columbus; Lake McConaughy; Motel Raine in Valentine; North Platte Hampton Inn; Ole’s Big Game Bar and Grill in Paxton; The Sand Bar and Grill in Norfolk; Smith Falls; Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge near Valentine.

Not so nice? You be the judge. Carhenge. We spent about 15 minutes at this Stonehenge replica made of old cars near Alliance. On our way back to the car, I asked Steve what he thought. He said, “It was everything I imagined and less. Much less.” Personally, I thought it was pretty cool.

What do you think? What are the nicest things you’ve seen in Nebraska or your home state? Let us know in the comment section below. We’d love to hear from you.

Nebraska’s Nicest #7 – Chimney Rock/Scottsbluff Monument

Nebraska’s Nicest #7 – Chimney Rock/Scottsbluff Monument

Any trip through western Nebraska should include a stop at Chimney Rock National Historic Site and the Scottsbluff National Monument in the Scottsbluff/Gering area.  I say this, because these are beautiful places with cool history.  These monuments are located along the Oregon Trail and were key landmarks for pioneers as they headed west seeking a better life.  Today, each has a modern visitors’ center (complete with restrooms) so you can learn the geologic history of the site.  We’ve combined them in this post because they are close to each other (in fact, you can see them from each other) and were geologically formed in the same way.  We include them at #7 on the “Nebraska’s Nicest” list because we loved the vistas, and we really enjoyed our visit.

At the Chimney Rock visitors’ center, we went through the museum, and then stepped out back to take in a view of the rock.  It is an incredible formation–I’ve never seen anything quite like it.  And that’s about all there is to do there.  Standing there, I felt kind of like Chevy Chase in “National Lampoon’s Vacation” when he looked at the Grand Canyon.  I looked at it, and then I’d seen it.  Still, it’s worth the stop…plus, in the museum you can learn lots of fun facts like the somewhat inappropriate name given the formation by Native Americans (Elk Penis) before any pioneers appeared on the horizon.  I guess those jokes work in all times, places and cultures–which I think is awesome though I’m not sure Ann agrees.

View from the top of the Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

View from the top of the Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

At the Scottsbluff Monument, we hurried to drive to the top so we could be in front of 4 massive RVs that pulled in right behind us. At the top, we had the place to ourselves and took some time to walk along the short path to take in a view looking off to the south and east.  It was an incredible view.  As I stood there, I could imagine a wagon train lumbering along the ground below–and no, I couldn’t even see the RVs at that point.

Taken at the overlook at the top of Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

Taken at the overlook at the top of Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

Both sites have a small admission charge.  At Scottsbluff monument you can do like we did and drive your car to the top and back down.   (There is NO shame in doing this.)  If you’re feeling more energetic, there is a hiking trail that leads to the top.  Workers told us that most folks plan on about 1.5 hours for the climb and 45 minutes for the descent.  Finally, there is a service that will drive you to the top so you can walk back down to your car.  (If you’re planning to hike any of these trails, take note of the signs warning of rattlesnakes–there have been some reported this year.  Just be sure you stick to the trail and watch your step.)

Trail at the top of Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

Trail at the top of Scottsbluff Monument (Photo by Ann Teget)

Finally, there are some unique gifts you can pick up in the gift shops–for instance, we picked up a blue bonnet for our daughter.  I mean, how often do you find a bonnet these days that would fit a junior in college?