Both my mom and my mother-in-law are big fans of Ree Drummond and The Pioneer Woman cooking show on Food Network. We’d been to Ree’s new Mercantile store and restaurant in Pawhuska twice this year, and when we returned home from our last trip, we could tell that both our moms were itching to see The Mercantile for themselves.

So, we planned a third trip to Pawhuska to show our moms the town and introduce them to the only chicken fried steak we’d admit was better than theirs.

Pawhuska, Oklahoma bench

Our moms relax for a minute on a Pawhuska bench.

Our first stop, after a getting a cold fountain pop at Handy’s, was the Pawhuska Chamber of Commerce. We introduced our moms to Joni and Reba and got some ideas for things to see and do while we were in town for a few days. We checked into our Airbnb house called Redbud Cottage and got settled in this wonderful three bedroom, two and a half bath house. It had a huge kitchen with complimentary coffee and more space than we really needed.

Redbud Cottage kitchen, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The Redbud Cottage has a large modern kitchen available to people staying there.

After unpacking our bags, we headed downtown to The Mercantile where our moms had a great time shopping and buying Ree Drummond’s newest cookbook, “Come and Get It,” which was released for sale that day.

The Pioneer Woman Cooks, "Come and Get It" cookbook.

The Pioneer Woman Cooks, “Come and Get It” cookbook.

My mom is a Weight Watchers leader and just loved this tiny plate that should help with portion control. Gayle bought several gifts for friends and we all left with one of the greatest plastic wrap dispensers we’ve ever found.

Pioneer Woman Mercantile portion control plate, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Carol found a plate at the PW Mercantile that’s perfect for those wanting to control portion size.

We enjoyed a lovely dinner (with no wait) at The Mercantile, including queso dip, chicken fried steak, pork chops, and a salad.

Pioneer Woman Mercantile Deli, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Steve and his mom anticipate dinner at the PW Mercantile Deli.

With Ree in New York City promoting her new cookbook, Ladd was at the restaurant for dinner that night and was gracious to take pictures with people as he waited for his meal.

Ladd Drummond and our moms

Ladd Drummond and our moms

The next morning, we headed back to The Pioneer Woman Mercantile for breakfast, our favorite meal of the day. We sipped coffee and enjoyed a relaxing meal, including cooked-to-order eggs, three types of pork (ham, bacon, and house made sausage), homemade biscuits with jam, and a side of buttermilk pancakes with four types of syrup.

Pioneer Woman Mercantile Deli farmer's breakfast, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The Farmer’s Breakfast offers a sampling of many favorites.

Pioneer Woman Mercantile biscuits, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Buttery, light, and flaky don’t begin to do these biscuits justice.

Pioneer Woman Mercantile pancakes, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

With three different kinds of butter and four kinds of syrup, Edna Mae’s Pancakes at the Merc taste even better than they look.

Needless to say, we were not going to need lunch that day. After breakfast, we headed out to the Drummond Lodge where Ree and Ladd had generously opened up their guest house to visitors. We were able to take a self-guided tour around the lodge, stopping to play kitchen where Ree often films here Food Network show.

Pioneer Woman Drummond Lodge kitchen, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Gayle had fun being in the place she’s always enjoyed seeing on TV.

Having watched The Pioneer Woman TV show for years, it was so much fun to see our moms in that space, reminiscing about seeing this or that on the show.

Pioneer Woman Lodge kitchen, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Carol has seen this stove in action on TV many times, and enjoyed checking it out for herself.

We walked around the lodge together, admiring the cozy living room, the boot-lined mantle, and the enormous pantry.

Pioneer Woman Lodge, boots on the mantle, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

This boot-lined mantle was picture perfect.

Pioneer Woman Lodge pantry, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The pantry at the Lodge is well stocked with anything Ree might need for a recipe. This is one of several sets of shelves there.

Pioneer Woman Lodge back pantry, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Carol couldn’t believe how many pots and pans there are in the back pantry at the Lodge.

Pioneer Woman Lodge dishes, Pawhuska Oklahoma

Stacks of dishes line the shelves of the pantry in the Lodge.

Before leaving, we enjoyed the view from the deck at the lodge and checked out the outdoor grill on which we’d seen Ladd and Ree cook the perfect beef steak.

Pioneer Woman Lodge grill, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Gayle and Carol have seen many episodes featuring this grill that sits outside the Lodge.

Our next stop was at one of our favorite places in Pawhuska — the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. This local church houses some of the most beautiful stained glass windows we’ve ever seen.

Osage Window, Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The Osage Window in the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is simply spectacular.

The most famous window shows Father Shoenmaker bringing Catholicism to the Osage people. To even be created, the window required special dispensation from the Pope because it depicts people who were alive at the time it was made.

Next stop was the Osage Nation Museum. I’d been there a few weeks ago, so Steve took our moms inside and I was planning to go visit someone who lived close by. I never made it across the street because just as I got out of the car, a woman in a truck drove by rolled down her window to say, “Are you that blogger lady?” It was Margie Williams, one of the contestants (and winners) from the National Indian Taco Championship we’d judged a few weeks earlier.

Ann with Margie Williams, Pawhuska Oklahoma

Ann had a great time catching up with Margie Williams while we were in Pawhuska.

We had such a nice visit and she gave us a few more ideas of things to see and do in Pawhuska. Before we knew it, Steve and the moms were back from the museum and it was time to head back downtown.

We dropped my mom and Gayle off at Roaming the Osage Historic/Scenic Tours, where they spent the next 90 minutes touring Pawhuska and seeing the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, The Grandview Inn B&B, and learning about the history of Osage County.

Roaming the Osage Historic/Scenic Tour van, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

All settled in and ready for the tour!

The next morning, we took one of Margie’s suggestions and went up to Lookout Mountain where we had an incredible view of Pawhuska and visited the gravesite of Chief Fred Lookout and his wife Julia.

Lookout Mountain, Fred and Julia Lookout grave marker, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The grave marker of Chief Fred Lookout and his wife Julia sits atop Lookout Mountain.

Lookout Mountain view toward Pawhuska, Oklahoma

The view from Lookout Mountain is incredible. In this photo, you can see Pawhuska in the distance.

We spent time in some of our favorite shops, including Buckin’ Flamingo, Mudpies, Salt Creek Gallery and Marketplace, LOREC Ranch, and Osage Outfitters.

Buckin' Flamingo merchandise, Pawhuska Oklahoma

Some of the fun merchandise available at the Buckin’ Flamingo.

Mudpies jewelry, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Jewelry at Mudpies.

Salt Creek Gallery and Marketplace bags, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Both Ree Drummond and JoAnna Gaines carry one of these bags.

LOREC Ranch furniture and accessories, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

A great selection of western furniture and accessories is available at the LOREC Ranch.

Osage Outfitters boots, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Some of the unique boots available at Osage Outfitters.

Both of our moms loved Tallgrass Art Gallery, and my mom decided to splurge on a fetish necklace that she wore out of the store.

Tallgrass Art Gallery, fetish necklace, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Carol bought a unique necklace for herself at the Tallgrass Art Gallery.

Before calling it a day, we had a chance to have a private tour of the Bronze Horse Foundry, which was absolutely amazing. Cindy Free showed us the extensive processes used to create bronze sculptures. It was so interesting and we were so grateful for the time she spent showing us around.

Bronze Horse Foundry sculpture, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

A statue begins to take shape at the Bronze Horse Foundry.

Bronze Horse Foundry ceramic shells, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

These ceramic shells are almost ready for molten bronze.

Bronze Horse Foundry detail work, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

All of the fine details the artist puts into the clay will appear in the bronze when it is complete.

Bronze Horse Foundry finish work, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Workers at the foundry work to finish this bronze casting.

Bronze Horse Foundry figurine, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

This clay figurine is ready for the next step in casting it as a bronze.

Our last stop of the day was at the legendary Swinging Bridge, just a few blocks away from The Mercantile. We’d braved a walk across the suspension bridge on a past visit and were sure we’d convince our moms to do the same. We sensed their hesitancy and pleaded with them to walk across, but they just weren’t having it.

Swinging Bridge, Pawhuska, Oklahoma

We could get our moms onto the end of the swinging bridge, but no further.

Like we did when we were kids, we kept asking and asking and finally said, “Why not?”

The looks they gave us said it all. “Because I said so.”  We love our moms very much, and we know not to argue with that.


Have you taken a mother/daughter or mother/son trip? Where did you go and what did you enjoy most about it? Let us know, we’d love to hear from you. 

  • This is our Airbnb, Postcard Place. It's located right in Pawhuska, just a two and a half minute drive from the Pioneer Woman's Mercantile. It even has its own Instagram account, @postcardplce. ⁣
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Postcard Place can accommodate up to six people. With comfy bedding (including clean duvets for each new guest), USB ports by every bed, make-up remover wipes, comfy blankets for tv viewing, complimentary coffee/tea, creamer, full kitchen, soap, shampoo, hand lotion, and even a luggage scale, we've tried to think of everything you might want when spending a night away from home. Of course, we also provide stamped Pawhuska postcards so you can send greetings to those who couldn't come along on the trip.⁣
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Find Postcard Place on Airbnb and book it for your next trip to Pawhuska and come @visittheosage.
  • Perched high on a hill in Tuscany is the medieval village of Montepulciano. In the center of town is the piazza grande paved with bricks laid in a herringbone pattern in the 14th century. ⁣
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Standing in the piazza, looking at the bricks, we were filled with a sense of awe at the history these bricks have seen. They've been there for 700 years so have seen times of war and peace, celebration and sorrow. Generation after generation of townsfolk were born, lived and died, and all have walked on these bricks. ⁣
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This is one of the things we love most about traveling. It gives us an authentic feel for history, one we wouldn't have if we just stayed at home.
  • We were so tickled when @thechefandthedish reached out and asked us if we'd like to take a complimentary cooking class with them. They offer private cooking classes with chefs from all over the world that you can take right in your own kitchen. ⁣
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For this class, we Skyped with chef Paola who taught us to make strawberry risotto, traditional bruschetta, and a delicious poached pear dessert that blew our minds. ⁣
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Risotto always seemed like a difficult dish to make, but Chef Paola explained it so well that it wound up being pretty easy. We spent a great afternoon with friends, learned something new, and enjoyed a great meal after. A class with The Chef & The Dish is a great gift idea, as well. Follow the link in our bio, and you can read more about our class on our blog.
  • The world is a big place, and there's so much to discover. Go places, and see things. It doesn't matter if you don't have a detailed itinerary, either. Sometimes, it's more about the journey and what you see and experience along the way, than it is about the destination.
  • During our trip in Tuscany with @italyunfiltered, we stopped at a small family winery. After learning about the organic methods they use to produce high quality Chianti Clasico wines, we had a tasting. ⁣
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Wine tastings in Italy are nothing like those in the US. They are glorious affairs complete with delicious foods paired with the incredible wines. This particular winery brought us samples of homemade, organic jams made from fruits grown in the family's garden. We dabbed these on locally produced pecorino cheese. Yum!⁣
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We're so glad that we had a local driver and guide. Stopping here was a highlight of our Italian adventure, and we never would have found it on our own.
  • The village of Marsaxlokk, Malta, is famous for these brightly painted fishing boats. The design is rather ancient, possibly dating back to Phoenician times, though it's still used today because it is very strong and holds up well in rough weather. One feature of each boat's decorations, are eyes painted on the bow of the boat. These eyes are said to protect the people fishing while they are at sea.
  • The blue cobblestones of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, are actually part of a recycling project which started 500 years ago. Iron foundries in Spain produced huge piles of waste, called slag. Rather than throw these piles away, the slag was made into blocks which was placed into ships as ballast. The ballast was offloaded in Puerto Rico when they loaded products bound for Spain. The blocks were then used to pave the streets. ⁣
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Pretty good idea, and 500 years later, they are holding up well!
  • The Overseas Highway connects Key West and the Florida Keys to the mainland U.S. While the entire road is a marvel of engineering, the centerpiece is the Seven Mile Bridge, which runs over water for, well, seven miles.⁣
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The next time you're driving, reset your trip odometer and wait until it gets to seven miles. You'll see that's a pretty long distance. And then think about the fact that people built a bridge over water with no land to support them for that distance. Pretty incredible-especially since the first one was built in 1912.

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