I nearly did not make it to our honeymoon. Seriously. Just minutes before (or maybe even several after) we were supposed to leave for the airport for a week-long honeymoon in paradise, I couldn’t find my camera’s charging cord. Not only was the camera cord lost, but I was losing my mind.  I raced through the house like a crazy woman, searching every nook and cranny for that darn cord. I darted from room to room with tears welling up in my eyes at the thought of seeing Costa Rica for the first time without my camera. I emptied nearly every drawer in the house and searched every bag as my husband stood helpless in the living room, wondering if he was ever going to get his new bride in the car and on the plane.

Eventually, I found the cord,  threw it in my backpack, calmed down, and we enjoyed an amazing week in the land of pura vida. And I have the pictures to prove it. See how relaxed I look?

Calm and relaxed at Tabacon Hot Springs in Costa Rica. (Photo by Steve Teget for postcard jar.com)

Calm and relaxed at Tabacon Hot Springs in Costa Rica. (Photo by Steve Teget for postcard jar.com)

So happy I had a charged camera to capture the beautiful flowers in Costa Rica. (Photo by Ann Teget for postcard jar.com)

So happy I had a charged camera to capture the beautiful flowers in Costa Rica. (Photo by Ann Teget for postcard jar.com)

Steve had a glorious day of relaxation at Manuel Antonio Beach in Costa Rica. (Photo by Ann Teget for postcard jar.com)

Steve had a glorious day of relaxation at Manuel Antonio Beach in Costa Rica. (Photo by Ann Teget for postcard jar.com)

When we got home, I realized I had issues. With cords. I never put them in the same place. They were typically tangled. And, I was always scrambling at the last minute before a trip to find every connection I’d need. It drove my husband nuts and I had to find a solution.

So I did. To best organize all of the cords I need for a trip, I keep them all in one place — an inexpensive, clear, plastic bag I found at our local Wal-Mart for a couple bucks. I neatly fold each cord and secure it with a hair band that is soft and easy to remove. In addition, I’ve purchased duplicates of almost all of my cords, so that I have one set that I use around the house, and one set that is ready to go in my carry-on bag whenever we leave for a trip.

I make sure I have extra batteries, ear buds, phone chargers, camera cords, and USB adapters and can I just say that preparing to get out the door is SO MUCH EASIER. Just ask my husband.  (Note from Steve:  It is so much better now.  So much.)

How do you manage all of the electronics and cords you need for a trip? Leave us a comment below, we’d love to hear from you.

  • This is our Airbnb, Postcard Place. It's located right in Pawhuska, just a two and a half minute drive from the Pioneer Woman's Mercantile. It even has its own Instagram account, @postcardplce. ⁣
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Postcard Place can accommodate up to six people. With comfy bedding (including clean duvets for each new guest), USB ports by every bed, make-up remover wipes, comfy blankets for tv viewing, complimentary coffee/tea, creamer, full kitchen, soap, shampoo, hand lotion, and even a luggage scale, we've tried to think of everything you might want when spending a night away from home. Of course, we also provide stamped Pawhuska postcards so you can send greetings to those who couldn't come along on the trip.⁣
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Find Postcard Place on Airbnb and book it for your next trip to Pawhuska and come @visittheosage.
  • Perched high on a hill in Tuscany is the medieval village of Montepulciano. In the center of town is the piazza grande paved with bricks laid in a herringbone pattern in the 14th century. ⁣
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Standing in the piazza, looking at the bricks, we were filled with a sense of awe at the history these bricks have seen. They've been there for 700 years so have seen times of war and peace, celebration and sorrow. Generation after generation of townsfolk were born, lived and died, and all have walked on these bricks. ⁣
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This is one of the things we love most about traveling. It gives us an authentic feel for history, one we wouldn't have if we just stayed at home.
  • We were so tickled when @thechefandthedish reached out and asked us if we'd like to take a complimentary cooking class with them. They offer private cooking classes with chefs from all over the world that you can take right in your own kitchen. ⁣
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For this class, we Skyped with chef Paola who taught us to make strawberry risotto, traditional bruschetta, and a delicious poached pear dessert that blew our minds. ⁣
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Risotto always seemed like a difficult dish to make, but Chef Paola explained it so well that it wound up being pretty easy. We spent a great afternoon with friends, learned something new, and enjoyed a great meal after. A class with The Chef & The Dish is a great gift idea, as well. Follow the link in our bio, and you can read more about our class on our blog.
  • The world is a big place, and there's so much to discover. Go places, and see things. It doesn't matter if you don't have a detailed itinerary, either. Sometimes, it's more about the journey and what you see and experience along the way, than it is about the destination.
  • During our trip in Tuscany with @italyunfiltered, we stopped at a small family winery. After learning about the organic methods they use to produce high quality Chianti Clasico wines, we had a tasting. ⁣
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Wine tastings in Italy are nothing like those in the US. They are glorious affairs complete with delicious foods paired with the incredible wines. This particular winery brought us samples of homemade, organic jams made from fruits grown in the family's garden. We dabbed these on locally produced pecorino cheese. Yum!⁣
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We're so glad that we had a local driver and guide. Stopping here was a highlight of our Italian adventure, and we never would have found it on our own.
  • The village of Marsaxlokk, Malta, is famous for these brightly painted fishing boats. The design is rather ancient, possibly dating back to Phoenician times, though it's still used today because it is very strong and holds up well in rough weather. One feature of each boat's decorations, are eyes painted on the bow of the boat. These eyes are said to protect the people fishing while they are at sea.
  • The blue cobblestones of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, are actually part of a recycling project which started 500 years ago. Iron foundries in Spain produced huge piles of waste, called slag. Rather than throw these piles away, the slag was made into blocks which was placed into ships as ballast. The ballast was offloaded in Puerto Rico when they loaded products bound for Spain. The blocks were then used to pave the streets. ⁣
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Pretty good idea, and 500 years later, they are holding up well!
  • The Overseas Highway connects Key West and the Florida Keys to the mainland U.S. While the entire road is a marvel of engineering, the centerpiece is the Seven Mile Bridge, which runs over water for, well, seven miles.⁣
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The next time you're driving, reset your trip odometer and wait until it gets to seven miles. You'll see that's a pretty long distance. And then think about the fact that people built a bridge over water with no land to support them for that distance. Pretty incredible-especially since the first one was built in 1912.

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