It may surprise you that despite spending most of my career as a public school administrator, I was actually an anthropology major in college. Yes, that’s right, I majored in anthropology and am not ashamed to admit that I’m an archaeology geek. I loved the semesters I spent studying the Mesoamerican cultures and their histories. So, when I realized our cruise last summer was stopping close enough for me to get a firsthand look at the ruins of Chichén Itzá, Mexico, I was super stoked. After all, it is one of the seven wonders of the world.

Progresso, Mexico, rainbow

A rainbow in Progresso, Mexico, provided foreshadowing to the mix of showers and sun we’d have today.

Our ship docked near Progresso, Mexico, on a gorgeous June morning. When we looked out the window of our stateroom, we saw a beautiful rainbow in the distance, with tropical showers scattered all around. Something told me this was going to be an amazing day. And it was.

The trip from the port to Chichén Itzá is about two hours down a modern highway. We rolled along, passing in and out of rain showers while our guide explained local culture and history to us. This, along with the lush, green scenery and the excitement of being someplace new, helped the time pass quickly and soon enough we pulled into the entrance of Chichén Itzá where the van driver gave us each a bottle of water and an umbrella that could be used to block both rain and sun.

Chichén Itzá tour guide, Mexico

Our tour guide for the day knew a great deal about the history and culture at Chichén Itzá.

Let me just say that Chichén Itzá is a pretty busy place. When you walk in, there are people everywhere trying to sell you those cute, seemingly irresistible trinkets that you want to buy but know you don’t have any place to put them in your house if you do.

Because we had a guide, we moved pretty quickly past the mass of souvenir vendors and into a clearing near the center of the archaeological site. There, I had my first look at the pyramid that dominates the site and is considered one of the seven wonders of the world and the first one of those I’d seen with my own eyes.

Chichén Itzá main pyramid, Mexico

“El Castillo,” the main pyramid at Chichén Itzá, is considered one of the seven wonders of the world.

Seeing it, I could understand why it has earned that designation. Look at the two people standing in front of it in the picture below–it will give you some sense of just how huge this pyramid is.

Chichén Itzá, base of main pyramid, Mexico

Serpents’ heads guard the bottom of the steps of the main pyramid at Chichén Itzá.

We walked through the ruins with our guide, stopping to look at the playing field of the sacred ball game. This game, a sort of combination of soccer and basketball in which players tried to get a solid rubber ball through a vertical stone hoop without using their hands, often lasted for days before someone scored a point and ended the game. The guide told us that the winning team won a prize unlike anything given to winners today. They won the privilege of being sacrificed to the gods.

Sacred ball game court, Chichén Itzá, Mexico

The court used to play the sacred ball game at Chichén Itzá. the goal was to get a solid rubber ball through the stone hoop suspended high up on the right side of this photo.

We wandered some more, stopping to look at bas-relief carving in the stone. Archaeologists have used carvings like these to help them get a better understanding of the ancient culture.

Chichén Itzá hieroglyphs, Mexico

These hieroglyphs help archaeologists understand what took place in Chichén Itzá.

At the conclusion of the guided portion of our tour, we had some time to walk the site by ourselves and explore the ruins. As we walked, I thought of the generations of people who once lived and worked in this ancient city.

Chichén Itzá, Mexico

A view across the archaeological site at Chichén Itzá, Mexico.

I imagined the effort needed to build a massive stone pyramid, and thought of the amount of precise math needed to to align that pyramid just so it could be used as a calendar more accurate than the one we use today. I thought of the laughter and tears and children running that once filled the streets here. And I marveled that for all that we know about this place, there is so much more we don’t begin to understand.

As we drove away, I felt satisfaction that I’d finally visited but still had a yearning to know more about the people who once lived in Chichén Itzá. It’s what will bring me back again, someday.

  • One of our favorite stops on our hosted food tour of @visitkansascityks was the @403club. Sure, they offer a great selection of locally crafted and larger production domestic beers. But they also have pinball machines. In fact, they even have a pinball league.⁣
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We spent about an hour in this fun spot, sipping, playing, and enjoying the relaxed atmosphere. It will definitely be on our list of places to go again, someday. Beer and pinball are a pretty good mix.
  • On our visit to Italy, we visited the Prosecco region. While we toured a number of wineries, we actually stayed at an inn run by the Roccat winery. ⁣
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Prosecco is a sparkling wine, and people often see it as intergangeable with champagne. This isn't the case at all. Champagne is made from the Chardonnay grape, while Prosecco comes from Glara. Because of this, the two wines are completely different.⁣
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We enjoyed a tasting at Roccat, where they served us glasses of crisp, clear, delicious wine alongside some crunchy breadsticks that were just the right thing to enjoy with the wine.⁣
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If you ever have the opportunity to go to Italy, make sure you include time to head to Valdobbiandene and try some Prosecco.
  • Located in @clearlakeiowa, the historic Surf Ballroom has hosted some of the biggest names in music. It was on this stage that Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and JP "The Big Bopper" Richardson performed their final show on February 3, 1959. After the concert, they boarded a plane for their next town on their tour. That plane crashed shortly after takeoff, and the date has been remembered ever since as "the day the music died."⁣
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@traveliowa
  • Set in Millennium Park in Chicago is one of the city's most iconic art installations. It's a giant, shiny bean which reflects everything in sight. It's fun to walk around (and under) the bean and see how the shape distorts what it reflects.⁣
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Folks come from all over to see this art installation and take it in. Children love running around it and gazing into it, not realizing they are learning about convex and concave shapes. ⁣
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Standing here you'll hear a multitude of languages and see people from all walks of life there to enjoy the art. And that's why we love public art so much--it brings people together.
  • On our cruise from Italy to Greece, we made a stop in Mykonos. There, we had the chance to take part in a Greek cooking class in a woman's home learning from her.⁣
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We spent an afternoon with lessons about Greek cuisine, and how they waste nothing, not even excess juice from a cucumber. We also saw how to make incredible dishes like this spanakopita, or spinach pie. Sitting in her dining room, enjoying the light, flaky crust and delicious filling is an experience we won't soon forget. ⁣
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While traveling, we try to find opportunities to experience local culture. It's amazing how similar people in the world really are if you just take some time to see what life is like.
  • Do you remember that song from "The Music Man" about trouble? You know the one about the kids in the knickerbockers, shirt-tail young ones, peekin' in the pool hall window after school. ⁣
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Well, we got to peek in a replica of that pool hall on a recent visit to The Music Man Square on our hosted to Mason City, Iowa. It's the town where "The Music Man" creator Meredith Willson was born and raised and his legacy lives on. ⁣
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Before you go see @thehughjackman and @suttonlenore in this Broadway favorite, consider a visit to the real River City.⁣
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Click on the link in our bio to see our latest blog post about why fans of "The Music Man" need to visit Mason City, Iowa. ⁣
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@themusicmanbway
  • When we heard that there was a community garden in Clear Lake, Iowa, we figured we'd stop and check it out. We've seen small town community gardens before, and were expecting a few flower patches, some paving stones, and maybe a bench or two. After all, it was built and is maintained by volunteers in a small Iowa town. ⁣
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What we found, though, was simply astounding! First, the entire garden had been designed beautifully; a small stream even meandered through the gardens, pausing in small lily-filled pools before continuing on its path. But the flowers took the cake. So many varieties, each more beautiful than the last. And the entire space had been planned out to take advantage of the spring, summer, and autumn species. ⁣
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if you enjoy gardens, put the Central Gardens of North Iowa on your list of places to visit.
  • Calmar, Iowa, near Decorah, is home to Pivo Brewery and Blepta Studios. There you'll find high quality craft beers, in a relaxed, fun environment. Upstairs from the taproom are the studios, where you can try your hand at art while sipping your beer.

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