Space Center Houston is just what the child inside you wants it to be. As you drive up to the entrance, your view is dominated by a 747 with a space shuttle on its back. I mean, what could be cooler than that?

Earlier this summer, we took a week-long road trip south to Texas. We had taken tours of the Pioneer Woman Mercantile and Lodge in Oklahoma, as well as Magnolia Market and Harp Design Company in Waco, so I was ready for a change of pace away from cooking and home decor. Sure, we’d had great meals at the Merc and at Vitek’s BBQ, but I was ready to feed my brain and not just my face.

Trying out flight seats at Space Center Houston

Steve and Meghan try out a couple mock-up flight seats at Space Center Houston.

We arrived at Space Center Houston late in the afternoon, the drive from Waco having taken a bit longer than we’d planned due to toll roads and traffic around Houston. We arrived about two hours before closing, meaning that we got to park right up front in a spot vacated by someone who’d been there earlier in the day and had left; after a long drive, things were looking up!

We went inside and learned that the last tram to tour Mission Control would be leaving soon, so we quickly climbed aboard. (Quick travel tip here: when selecting a seat on the tram learn from our mistake and sit as far away as you can from the man who wants to talk loudly about alligators in the Louisiana swamp. This will give you a better chance at hearing the narration.)

The tram trundled across the grounds, stopping occasionally for gates to swing open. We went by large buildings with rockets painted on their sides and finally arrived outside a cement 1960’s-style office building labeled “Apollo Mission Control Center.”

Apollo Mission Control at Space Center Houston

Steve standing outside the doors of the Apollo Mission Control Center.

We were ushered inside the building, up about 12,000 steps (there was an elevator available for those who needed it) and through a door. And there it was. Mission Control. It looked just like you remember from every film about the Apollo program you’ve ever seen. The room was in pristine condition, a window to the finest technology available in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, when moon landings were taking place. Everything was there, just as it was when the mission controllers left the room 40 years ago, looking like they might return from a lunch break at any time. You could even see a red rotary phone sitting high atop a console–the famous phone with the direct link to the Pentagon used so often in movies where humans have to coordinate Earth’s defenses against hostile aliens.

Apollo Mission Control Center Space Center Houston

Steve poses in front of the Apollo Mission control room at Space Center Houston.

The red phone in the Apollo Mission Control Center

The “red phone” was a direct line to the Pentagon during the Apollo missions to the moon.

We were allowed into the VIP observation room for a quick orientation as to what we were seeing. We sat down in the same comfortable theater seating (complete with ashtrays) that was used by generals, high-ranking government officials, and family members of astronauts as they nervously watched moon landings unfold live.

An ashtray on a chair in the VIP observation room of Apollo Mission Control

An ashtray is attached to a chair in the VIP observation room behind the Apollo Mission Control Center at Space Center Houston.

From Mission Control, we hopped back on the tram and set off for our next stop, pausing for a moment at a memorial for astronauts who have died while serving at NASA. We continued on our way and got to a large building that held a Saturn V rocket, the rocket that took the Apollo missions into space and then on to the moon. As you can see, it’s a pretty big rocket. Placed on its side, it would be longer than a football field. Note how I’m dwarfed by each of the five first-stage engines.

Saturn V rocket engine at the Space Center Houston

The engines on the Saturn V rocket used for the Apollo Missions were pretty big.

A Saturn V rocket at Space Center Houston

Steve and Meghan walk (and walk) alongside a Saturn V rocket –the rocket used for the Apollo missions.

From the Saturn V rocket building, we went back to the museum. Now, about 45 minutes before closing, we had to hurry to the exhibits we wanted to see. But, about 45 minutes from closing, there really were very few people left in the museum so we were able to move pretty quickly. We first went outside to that 747/space shuttle combination we saw when we parked. We rode the elevator up to the top and stepped aboard the mock-up of the space shuttle. Immediately I stuck my head inside the cockpit to take a look around. It’s amazing that people can learn what all those switches and buttons do.

Space Center Houston space shuttle cockpit

The cockpit of the space shuttle.

In addition to the cockpit, we saw a space suit as well as astronaut sleeping “quarters” aboard the space shuttle. The “quarters” consisted of a sleeping bag tied to the wall that would just float in the weightless environs of space.

A space suit at Space Center Houston

A space suit like those worn by astronauts aboard the space shuttle when they took space walks.

Astronaut sleeping "quarters" on the space shuttle

Sleeping “quarters” aboard the space shuttle consisted of a sleeping bag attached to a wall so the astronaut doesn’t float away.

Finally, we also saw the, um, facilities that astronauts used to answer the call of nature. I’ll just let you use your imagination on this one as to how everything works in the weightlessness of space where you don’t want certain things floating around.

Space shuttle restroom

The restroom facilities look a little different on board a space shuttle.

Back inside the museum, we stopped at a number of other exhibits, including one on the Mercury missions. We saw the Faith 7 Mercury Spacecraft that actually carried Gordon Cooper on his 1963 mission.

Faith 7 Mercury Space Craft

The actual Mercury space capsule flown by astronaut Gordon Cooper on May 15-16, 1963.

Next we wandered over and looked at the Apollo 17 Command Module that flew the final mission to the moon in December, 1972. This mission brought back samples of rock from the moon’s surface including one we were able to touch!

The Apollo 17 Command Module

The Apollo 17 Command Module flew Dec 7-19, 1972. This last Apollo mission successfully traveled to moon and back. This capsule is named “America.”

You can touch a rock from the moon at Space Center Houston

Steve and Meghan touched the moon at Space Center Houston. It’s one of the only places you can touch a rock from the moon.

By now, it was nearing time for the museum to close. We regretted that we hadn’t gotten there a little earlier, but were also glad we’d avoided so many of the crowds that would have been there during the height of the day. We resolved that we’ll just have to go back someday. The child inside me will remember that promise hold us to it.


Have you ever toured Space Center Houston? Tell us about it in the comments section below.

  • Late breakfast, early lunch. Time got away from us this morning so we had a bit of a brunch. We have been on an oatmeal kick this year for several reasons. It's inexpensive, filling, tastes great, and is typically readily available at grocery stores and hotels that serve breakfast. ⁣
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One cup of oatmeal cooked in water is about 160 calories (and a "green" food on our @noom weight loss app). We like to add a teaspoon of brown sugar, a little cinnamon, and lots of fresh berries. Other options are: bananas, nuts, nutmeg, diced apple, flax seed, or dried fruits. ⁣
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What is your go-to breakfast these days?
  • See how we lost a combined 150 pounds in a year while traveling! It was one year ago this week that we began our healthy living journey. We are travel bloggers with a new post (just click on the handy dandy link in our bio) about what we've lost and gained in one year.
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See what we've learned about calorie density, exercise and ourselves in the process. We are so thankful for the resources that have helped us, including @noom and the @mayoclinic Healthy Living Program. (This is NOT a paid partnership) We feel like new people and hope our story will encourage someone else who wants to make a healthy lifestyle change. To stay up to date with our weight loss and healthy living journey, be sure to follow @PostcardJar on social media.
  • Our daffodils are in full bloom here in Nebraska and they just make us smile. We brought the  bulbs for these flowers from Ann's first house when we got married and moved here. Ann had dug them up from her grandma Rashleigh's home in Fremont, Nebraska, and her grandma had brought them to the U.S. from a trip that she took to England. ⁣
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Ann's grandma passed away several years ago. Each spring, these flowers bloom and remind Ann of her grandma and her beautiful soul.
  • We love to travel but we're staying home to flatten the curve. As travel bloggers, writers, and influencers, we all have canceled trips, postponed adventures, and rescheduled experiences. ⁣
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We know this is temporary and soon enough, we'll be traveling again. But for now, we are all staying safe at home and encourage you to do the same. And while you’re home, check out some of these influencers’ feeds for travel inspiration.
  • Last week, we had the pleasure of making handmade pasta (via the internet) with our friends, Deb and Massi, who were in their home kitchen in Italy. ⁣
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You can read all about it, and get the recipe, on our blog. Yep, you guessed it, the link is in our bio. ⁣
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We met Deb and Massi of @italyunfiltered a few years ago when they created an amazing food and wine itinerary for us. We've remained friends and it was so good to see them, even if they were a world away.
  • We were supposed to be in Rochester, Minnesota, this week for Ann to see a cardiac sarcoidosis specialist about some recent issues with her heart. Of course, we did not travel to Rochester for her scans and doctor visits because of the coronavirus outbreak.⁣
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Instead, her cardiologists called her from their homes and her scans and tests will likely be delayed until June or July. We'll keep in close touch with them if anything changes, as well. We are so grateful for all of the healthcare professionals who are continuing to work crazy hours from home as well as in our hospitals around the world.⁣
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This is such an unprecedented and stressful time for all of them. Words will never be enough to convey our gratitude for the roles they are playing in the battle against this deadly virus while caring for those with other diseases and illnesses at the same time. ⁣
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Every healthcare provider we've talked with in the last two weeks has had the same message for those of us who don't have to go to work at a hospital. ⁣
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Just. Stay. Home.
  • Yesterday was Day 16 of social isolation for us. Because of Ann's underlying heart condition and suppressed immune system, we've cooked all our meals at home (no takeout). We've starting to get more and more creative as time has gone by. ⁣
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Last night, we made chicken and shrimp vindaloo and learned online how to make homemade naan.⁣
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It wan't as good as our favorite Indian restaurant, The Oven, but it did satisfy the craving we've had for Indian food. ⁣
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What are you craving these days?
  • We moved our living room furniture around this week and put two swivel chairs near the sliding glass door. Each day, we take time to turn around, rest our minds, enjoy in the view, and just be. #webelieveinhome

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