A unique wine tasting in the woods and our stay near Montepulciano, Italy

A unique wine tasting in the woods and our stay near Montepulciano, Italy

When we went wine tasting in Tuscany (can I just interject that I’ve dreamt about saying those words for quite some time) I had no idea what to expect from our visit to the town of Montepulciano, other than we would likely be tasting Vino Nobile, the typical wine of the region.

Montepulciano, Italy

One of the beautiful views near the Podere della Bruciata vineyard.

Made largely from the Sangiovese grape, Vino Nobile de Montepulciano is a full-bodied, ruby red wine and I couldn’t wait to taste it in Tuscany (there, I just had to say it again). But before our hosted tasting at Podere Della Bruciata winery, we had a little time to explore the medieval city on the hill.

Our wonderful host and driver, Massi, gave us a complimentary transfer to Montepulciano. He graciously offered to drive us right to the Piazza Grande at the very top of the hill. From there, we were able to take in the incredible views of the Tuscan countryside.

Montepulciano, Italy view

A view across the countryside from the walled city of Montepulciano, in Italy.

Steve and I spent several hours walking slowly down the hill through the narrow streets, stopping at small shops that sell everything from wine and cheese to shoes and clothing.

Our Stay at Villa Ambra

Later that afternoon, we went to the Villa Ambra hotel, whose owners had invited us for a complimentary stay and wine tasting. We got settled in the Doppia Superior room which was absolutely beautiful. The Villa Ambra is an 18-room, family owned bed and breakfast. The hard work and love that the family puts into every detail makes this an absolutely stupendous agritourism destination.

Villa Ambra guest room, Montepulciano, Italy

Our room at Villa Ambra was both clean and comfortable. In addition, it had a king-sized bed, private bathroom, and air conditioning that worked extremely well.

Our room was newly renovated. It included a comfy king bed with luxurious bedding and an artistic wall covering that made me feel truly immersed in Tuscany. We took our time settling in to our lovely accommodations and relaxing a bit before the wine tasting.

Our wine tasting in Montepulciano at Podere Della Bruciata

By late afternoon, it was time to head to the lobby to meet other guests for a tour and tasting at the family’s winery, Podere Della Bruciata. We got in vehicles and drove down the highway a bit to the vineyard entrance. We parked, and then walked down a dirt road while learning firsthand about the vines.

Podere della Bruciata vineyard, Montepulciano, Italy

Andrea explains the processes they use to grow and select grapes at their winery.

Andrea Rossi, a third-generation wine maker, was a wonderful guide and explained the processes they use to grow and select grapes for their wines. He was a great teacher, and answered all our questions along the way. As we continued our walk with him through the vineyard, I noticed the people in front of me turning off the road and following Andrea into the woods. Now you should know I’m not exactly fond of unknown nature excursions and was a little apprehensive about what was in store. Would there be more hiking? A wildlife encounter? Was I going to regret not bringing bug repellent?

Podere della bruciata wine tasting

Wine tasters head into a small clearing in some woods for the wine tasting.

Nope. We were actually being led to the site of our wine tasting. To watch a 47-second video with my reaction, click here.

Just a few steps into the woods, we found ourselves in a sort of secret hideaway. We stood in a cleared area shaded from the hot, Tuscan sun, surrounded by rock benches. In the center sat a large boulder that served as an exquisite table for our wine tasting and food pairing. It was glorious. I’ll pause here and let the photos do the talking.

Podere della Bruciata wine tasting, Montepulciano, Italy

Our hosts put out quite a spread for our wine tasting. It included bruschetta, cheeses, jams, salamis, and prosciutto.

Elisa and Andrea, Villa Ambra, Montepulciano

Both friendly and hard-working, Elisa and Andrea make every guest feel special and welcomed. Their efforts made this unique wine tasting experience something we’ll never forget.

Wine tasting at Villa Ambra

Andrea explains all that went into making the wine as guests listen and savor the result in a beautiful clearing in the woods.

We enjoyed the company of the other guests in a relaxed atmosphere as we tasted a variety of wines, each paired with delicious cured meats, cheeses, and homemade jams. It was almost surreal; we were tasting wine in the woods in Tuscany. Pinch me! At the conclusion of this amazing experience, we walked back to the cars while watching the sun set over the Tuscan hills.

Podere della Bruciata wine tasting

The group of wine tasters walks along a road in the vineyard.

Our dinner at Albergo Ristorante Villa Ambra

Back at the hotel, we met up with our hosts Deb of Italy Unfiltered and her husband Massi the Driver, for dinner at the Albergo Ristorante Villa Ambra. Andrea helped us select two wines, one that he’d crafted and the other created by his uncle, Marzio Pagliai. Then, the family began serving us a traditional Tuscan meal that turned out to be one of the most exquisite dining experiences we had during our entire stay in Italy.

Podere Della Bruciata wine, Montepulciano

The family’s winery, Podere Della Bruciata produces several wines including, “Ermete,” a Rosso di Montepulciano (red wine from Montepulciano).

The first course was bresaola, a cured beef sliced thinly and placed atop a bed of lettuce dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.

Villa Ambra bresaola, Montepulciano

Our meal started with bresaola, cured beef sliced thinly and placed atop a bed of lettuce dressed with lemon juice and olive oil.

Next, came my favorite course (pasta of course) which was linguini pasta with cinghiale, otherwise known as wild boar. It was incredible. Perfectly cooked al dente noodles in a creamy, savory sauce garnished with fresh parsley. Yes, I ate all of it. Every bite. And Steve was noticably disappointed that I didn’t ask him to help finish my plate.

Pasta course, Villa Ambra, Montepulciano

The pasta course: linguini pasta with cinghiale (wild boar). It was a-maz-ing.

Our main course was rosemary beef steak served with a grilled, stuffed onion and freshly picked garbanzo beans from the owners’ garden.

Sliced steak, Villa Ambra, Montepulciano

Our main course at dinner: sliced steak cooked to perfection and topped with fresh rosemary.

Appetizer at Villa Ambra, Montepulciano

On the side: a baked onion half topped with crunchy, seasoned bread crumbs served alongside garbanzo beans freshly picked from the owners’ garden.

Unsure if we could eat another bite, we somehow found room for a slice of lemon cheesecake for dessert.

Villa Ambra dessert, Montepulciano

Dessert: Lemon cheesecake with a pineapple slice. Yum!

After dinner, we sat and visited with Deb and Massi under the stars on the patio outside before heading to bed for a wonderful night’s sleep. Honestly, does it get any better than this?

Villa Ambra patio, Montepulciano

Guests can retire to the patio after dinner to enjoy a relaxing Tuscan evening.

The next morning, after sleeping like babies in the comfy bed, we woke to a farm fresh breakfast spread. We enjoyed a table filled with breads, meats and cheeses and a host of other delectable treats, including homemade cakes and jams.

Breakfast buffet, Villa Ambra, Montepulciano

A beautiful breakfast buffet greets guests in the morning.

Let me just say that one night at Villa Ambra was not enough for me and according to the owners, most people feel the same. Andrea said many of their guests stay for one or two weeks at a time. He said people relax at the hotel or by the pool and enjoy wine and cheese tours and tastings in the area. In fact, some guests even come during the late fall to participate in the grape harvest and wine bottling. Villa Ambra is open from March through November.

Villa Ambra hotel, Montepulciano

The main entrance of the Villa Ambra hotel.

We want to thank Andrea and his wife Elisa and everyone at Villa Ambra for hosting us and making us feel like a part of their incredible family. We can’t wait to come back.


 

Note: While the goods and services mentioned in this article were provided to us free of charge, the opinions are our own. For more information about Villa Ambra, visit their website at http://www.villaambra.com/en/.

 

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Our incredible private tour and cooking class in Chianti with Italy Unfiltered

Our incredible private tour and cooking class in Chianti with Italy Unfiltered

After spending a day on our own exploring beautiful Siena, Italy, our hosts Deb of Italy Unfiltered and her husband Massi the Driver picked us up at our hotel and we began our complimentary tour of Italian food, wine, and culture in the Chianti Region. As we got in the car, Steve confided in me that he’d already set his belt one notch looser in anticipation of the day.

Deb of Italy Unfiltered and her husband, Massi the Driver.

Of course, our first stop of the morning was for an espresso. This is a very Italian thing to do when you are having what Massi likes to call an “espresso deficiency.” I’m used to my Americano style coffee and still need a bit of milk in mine, so I ordered a caffe macchiato which is espresso with a dollop of foamed milk on top, typically served in a something that resembles a shot glass.

Cafe machiatto was a great cure for our espresso deficiency.

Now with the proper amount of caffeine in our systems, we headed down winding roads and up and down hills into the Chianti Clasccio region of Tuscany. The drive was incredibly beautiful and we were thankful that we had a personal driver and tour guide to not only tell us about the food and wine of the area but to actually get us there as there is no way we could have found this place by ourselves.

The family home where we did our cooking class and explored their winery.

The family home where we did our cooking class and explored their winery.

When we arrived at our destination, Deb and Massi greeted the owners who appeared to be old friends and they welcomed us into their home and winery. Our time with there began with a private cooking class.

Steve and I laced up our aprons and we got right to work. Our first lesson was in making traditional tiramisu, one of my all-time favorites.

We "mostly" separated six eggs for our tiramisu.

We “mostly” separated six eggs for our tiramisu.

We mostly separated six eggs and began beating the egg whites with an electric mixer. Sadly, we had spilled just a touch of yoke into the whites which was enough to ruin it. No worries. We started again and the second time around was successful.

As you can see, the the little bit of yolk that accidentally fell into the white ruined the process.

As you can see, the the little bit of yolk that accidentally fell into the white ruined the process.

Steve beat the egg yolks with a bit of sugar and then we folded the whites and yolks back together along with some mascarpone cheese.

Next, we dipped individual lady finger cookies in cooled espresso and placed them in a small, square dish. Then, we added a layer of the cream filling and sprinkling of cocoa powder before repeated the process again.

Our tiramisu, ready to set in the refrigerator. We marked each our creations with a colored band so we could see which one turned out the best.

Next, our instructor insisted that we take a few of the extra lady fingers and dip them in the left over espresso, then dip in the cream filling, and eat! Of course we had to try, I mean, we wouldn’t want to offend our host.

Then, because we’d worked so very hard on our tiramisu, our host broke out the Prosecco and served it with some fried pizza dough that had been sprinkled with sea salt. Prosecco and a snack? This was my type of cooking class.

Steve got very happy when the glasses of Prosecco and the fried pieces of pizza dough came out for a snack.

Steve got very happy when the glasses of Prosecco and the fried pieces of pizza dough came out for a snack.

Next, we learned to make fresh pasta using semolina flour, farm fresh eggs, and just a touch of Tuscan olive oil.

We kneaded the dough before rolling it into a ball and covering it with a bowl to prevent it from drying out.

Next, we used a rolling pin to roll our pasta out into a long rectangle. Once the dough was smooth and thin, we rolled it like a scroll from the top to the middle, and then up from the bottom so the rolls met in the middle.

After kneading and rolling the dough, we rolled it up from each end until they met in the middle.

Then we cut the rolls into small strips, separated them with our cutting knife, and voila — we have pasta!

Next, we cut the rolls into thin strips with a sharp knife.

The fun part was slipping the knife under the noodles and lifting in the middle to see them all unrolled.

Our third and final dish was traditional Tuscan bruschetta — that’s pronounced bru-sketta–which is an antipasto dish consisting of grilled bread topped with garlic and olive oil or other fresh things like tomatoes, basil, and mozzarella.

Tomatoes, basil, and garlic are the main ingredients in tomato bruschetta.

I’ve made bruschetta many times before, but a new tip in our class is to leave any extra tomato seeds and juices on the board after cutting the tomato. These hold much of the acidity of the tomato and can make the bruschetta too runny.

After our cooking class was finished, we wandered outside where Massi and Deb told us more about the gardens and vineyards on the property. We had fun checking out 50 year-old wisteria and some 100-year-old grape vines. The property was just beautiful — full of color and life.

One of the 100-year-old grape vines.

The property was filled with beautiful flowers and plants, including lots of fresh lavender.

Then, we walked up a view steps to a patio where the table was set for the most amazing wine tasting and lunch. My jaw must have dropped when I saw the view. It was just incredible.

This view was just stunning.

We began tasting wine, made right there on the property, along with the bruschetta we’d made and some other cured meats and cheeses.

At lunch, we tried the bruschetta we’d made along with other pizzas, cured meats, and cheeses.

Then, two types of pasta arrived, both using the noodles we’d made just a few minutes before. One dish had a mild tomato sauce with fresh torn basil while the other had a spicier red sauce and thyme. Both were delicious.

The pasta we made!

Throughout our intimate lunch, Deb and Massi shared their expertise about Tuscany and tradition. We learned so much about Chianti Classico wine, food preparation, and everything that goes into owning and operating a small, family winery in Tuscany.

The black rooster is a quick and easy way to spot a Chianti Classico wine.

After a long and relaxing lunch which ended with sweet bites of our tiramisu, we headed into the winery where Massi told us all about how the wine is made, stored, and perfected. We had ample opportunities to ask questions and take photographs, things we don’t always have the opportunities to do when traveling in group tours.

Chianti Classico wine.

As we headed back to the car, I couldn’t help but think that this opportunity would not have been possible without the help of Deb and Massi. They knew this family personally and were able to provide us with a Tuscan experience that is not easily found on TripAdvisor or in a Google search. The personalized experience they gave us made our day special, and it was all the more special because we only did things we wanted to do.


While the tour and transport services were provided to us free of charge by Italy Unfiltered and Massi the Driver, the opinions in this post are our own. To learn more about Deb and Massi’s services, email them at dlarsen5@icloud.com.

Watch a video about our day in Chianti with Deb and Massi at the link below.

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How we learned how to cook like an Italian on our trip to Tuscany.

 

How I fell into a Tuscan food coma – Part 2

How I fell into a Tuscan food coma – Part 2

[well]This is Part 2 about our complimentary Tuscan food tour with American, Deb, of Italy Unfiltered, and her Italian husband, Massi the Driver. To read Part 1, click HERE.[/well]

We left the bakery, simultaneously asking ourselves how we could possibly eat more and vowing to try. We walked to the car, admiring Siena’s rather imposing city wall as we set off for our next stop, the hidden farmer’s market.

The city wall in Siena, Italy.

Bricks in the city wall of Siena, Italy

An up-close look at the city wall in Siena, Italy. Can you imagine what it took to build this hundreds of years ago?

Massi drove us down narrow streets and through round-a-bouts that we were thankful not to have to maneuver on our own and within a few minutes, we pulled into what we thought was a vacant strip mall because it had no signs. Ann and I didn’t see a farmer’s market, but that didn’t slow our hosts. They led us through an unmarked doorway and into a fresh food lover’s dream.

Steve and Deb from Italy Unfiltered inside the secret food market in Siena, Italy.

Inside, vendors had set up shop selling chickens, proscuitto, fruits, vegetables, tomatoes, honeycomb, pasta and soap. All of it was fresh and in season and all of it looked amazing. With ingredients like these, we began to see why all the food here is so good.

We got to Siena just at the end of the cherry season. These were likely the last to be sold this season.

Deb, a Texan who herself is a graduate of culinary school, told us that Tuscan cuisine is based on three basic ideas: It’s seasonal, regional, and traditional. In other words, the food served at any point in the year is available fresh, and is prepared according to local recipes in the same way it was prepared hundreds of years ago.

Basil in the farmers' market, Siena, Italy.

Huge bunches of fresh basil were available at the hidden farmers’ market in Siena, Italy.

Pasta from the hidden farmers' market, Siena, Italy

We bought a package of this authentic pasta at the hidden farmers’ market.

We purchased some pasta which will be perfect on a cold October’s night and headed to our next stop – a roadside fruit and vegetable stand that sold some of the most beautiful produce we’ve ever seen.

I have to give props to Ann, she got some wonderful photos. I’ll let them do the talking, but know that everything we sampled tasted even better than it looked.

Fresh garlic and onions at a roadside stand.

Two must-haves in Italy – fresh garlic and red onions hanging at a roadside fruit and vegetable stand in Siena, Italy.

Peaches in the farmers' market, Siena, Italy.

Fresh peaches at a roadside fruit stand in Siena, Italy.

Vegetables at a roadside stand in Siena, Italy

Fresh vegetables at a roadside stand in Siena, Italy.

Fresh tomatoes in Siena, Italy.

Fresh tomatoes in a roadside stand in Siena, Italy.

We paused our tour at this point to make stop at an Italian electronics store where they sell everything from curling irons and coffee makers to televisions and refrigerators. Apparently, they take ironing very seriously here. Check this out:

Iron at electronics store, Siena, Italy

Italians take ironing very seriously. We have no idea what the bottom part of this iron does.

Check out the vast array of irons. But what all do they do?

While Deb and I looked around, Ann picked out a curling iron since she forgot the one that works on European outlets at home, and then we headed down the way to the coffee shop where Massi was waiting for us. There, we saw the most amazing little tarts, and we just had to try get a picture of one.

Tarts in Siena, Italy

These two little tarts were fresh and delicious!

These were so fresh that the blueberries burst in my mouth. Yum.

We hopped back in the car and drove to our final stop for lunch. Antica Salumeria Salvini is a place where they sell cured hams, sausages, and meats as well as fresh salads. As we approached the salumeria, Deb and Massi explained that the owner uses recipes that are several hundred years old and is so protective of them he hasn’t even shared them with his son.

Antica Salumeria Salvini, Siena, Italy

Inside Antica Salumeria Salvini.

When we entered the shop, Deb and Massi were greeted like old friends while Ann and I were welcomed like honored guests. We took a moment and wandered the shop admiring the hanging hams, drying sausages, and beautiful meats on display before heading to our table to settle in.

Salami at Antica Salumeria Salvini, Siena, Italy

Salami on display at Antica Salumeria Salvini.

We ordered a bottle of the house wine. When it came, something about the label caught our eyes. We looked closer and noticed that it was a picture of the owner of the shop lying on his side wearing only a crown of sausages. He did have a prosciutto ham placed strategically to preserve a little modesty.

House wine label at Antica Salumeria Salvini, Siena, Italy

Thank goodness for the well-placed prosciutto ham in this picture on the wine label.

It quickly became obvious that the owners are fun-loving people who are

Drive less so you can drink more.

This says, “Drive less so you can drink more,” in Italian.

full of personality. On a chalkboard was written, in Italian, “Drive less so you can drink more.” They were friendly, quick to share a laugh, and have a strange love of all things Texas.

We sat and chatted with Deb and Massi, by now feeling like they were old friends. Soon, the food began to come. Then more, and then more. It was like the salumeria was trying to beat us into submission.

First came a bowl of chilled pasta with pesto, then a bowl of panzanella, a bread salad made with tomatoes, basil, onion, salt, pepper, olive oil, and day-old bread crumbs.

Pasta with pesto at Antica Salumeria Salvini, Siena, Italy

This pasta with pesto was delicious!

Next came a meat and cheese board. On it were several different types of prosciutto, sausages, and cheeses, each one more delicious than the last. I’m not sure how long we sat eating, chatting, and eating some more, but I know that we felt a sense of relaxation down deep, the type of relaxation you feel when you finally disconnect from the rat race and settle in to a slower pace of life.

Antica salumeria salvino meat and cheese board, Siena, Italy

Who can resist the goodies on this delicious meat and cheese board?

At last our tour came to an end. Stuffed, we headed back to the car and then to our hotel. We got to our room, and I sat down to write about our experience, but I couldn’t keep my eyes open. I drifted off into a wonderful, relaxing, sleep. When we left the hotel later on that night to explore more of Siena, we did so with a much deeper understanding of the people and culture behind all we were seeing.

Photo with owner of Antica Salumeria Salvini

Steve and Ann stop for a photo with the owner of the Antica Salumeria Salvini.

We are so grateful we had the opportunity to do this foodie tour with Deb and Massi. We went places we would not have known existed, tasted about 30 new foods and wines we wouldn’t have known much about, and had behind-the-scenes experiences we never would have had without their expertise and connections.

Trust me, this is how you immerse yourself in Tuscany – one taste at a time.


Deb and Massi’s Foodie Tour and transfer services were provided to us free of charge, but the opinions expressed are our own. If you are traveling to Tuscany, you can book Deb and Massi’s services by visiting their websites at Italy Unfiltered or Massi the Driver.

 

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How I fell into a Tuscan food coma – Part 1

How I fell into a Tuscan food coma – Part 1

By Steve

I intended to write this post about our incredible first day with hosts Deb and Massi yesterday, but I accidentally slipped into a food coma. In all fairness, it isn’t my fault.

Deb and Massi

Deb and Massi.

I mean, they took us on a foodie tour of Siena, and it was a grueling delicious almost five hours of sampling some of the best food that Tuscany has to offer.

American Deb of Italy Unfiltered, and her Italian husband, Massi the Driver, have graciously provided complimentary tours for us during our first ever visit to Tuscany. A fun, outgoing couple, (read more about them HERE) they have incredible knowledge of the area and all it has to offer.

They picked us up at our hotel in Siena promptly at 10:15 a.m. Massi guided the car down narrow Siena streets before dropping Deb, Ann and I off at a coffee shop that is a local favorite. We went in and had a quick cafe macchiato which is a shot of espresso with a dollop of frothed milk. That little energy shot was just what we needed.

Cafe macchiato at a coffee shop in Siena, Italy.

Cafe macchiato at a coffee shop in Siena, Italy.

Next, we walked up the block to a place where amazing baked goods are born. Deb led us into a small local bakery, Il Magnifico, where Lorenzo the baker works his magic every night, so locals can savor his baked goods in restaurants, businesses, and schools every day.

il Magnifico Bakery shop, Siena, Italy

The shop at il Magnifico bakery, Siena, Italy.

We entered the shop, where Deb knew everyone, and she showed us different local products that the bakery makes like Ricciarelli, a traditional dessert biscotti made with almond flour and formed by hand. I’m pretty sure that once they are in the oven they are kissed by angels or something because these little powdered sugar-covered bites are nothing short of AMAZING!

Ricciarelli at il Magnifico bakery, Siena

These Ricciarelli taste like they were kissed by angels in the oven.

Deb went on to show us other specialties of the bakery, like Panforte, a cake made with dried fruits and nuts and happiness extract that combine to make a treat unlike any other we’ve tasted.

Panforte ready for sale at il Magnifico, Siena, Italy.

Beautifully wrapped panforte ready for sale at il Magnifico.

She next showed us another biscotti, Cavallucci, which got it’s name from its horse-hoof shape. This is important to Siena, because Siena is home to the Palio, an incredible horse race that happens twice a year, and has been going on for more than 400 years.

Biscotti at il Magnifico, Siena, Italy

Biscotti on display at il Magnfico Bakery, Siena, Italy

Suddenly, we were summoned to the back of the bakery. Lorenzo, the baker himself, wanted to talk to us.

Baking equipment at il Magnifico in Siena, Italy.

Some of Lorenzo’s baking equipment at il Magnifico in Siena, Italy.

We walked behind the counter and into a large, warm room filled with a huge oven and cooling racks, right into the heart of the operation. Standing in the room was Lorenzo, one of the smiliest, friendliest people we’ve met, yet.

Owner and baker Lorenzo at his bakery in Siena, Italy.

Owner and baker Lorenzo shows us a loaf of traditional Tuscan bread at his bakery in Siena, Italy.

He was so excited for us to be there, and he immediately began explaining all he does and his philosophy behind it. He talked ingredients, technique, and perhaps some thoughts on the chances of the Siena soccer team. We really didn’t know, because he said it all in an impressive stream of Italian that went on and on, seemingly without a break for air. Quickly, it became apparent that he was very proud of all he did, and was excited to welcome visitors from abroad and share openly with them.

Cantucci biscotti, Siena, Italy

Cantucci biscotti packaged for sale at il Magnifico bakery in Siena, Italy

When he paused for a moment, Deb stepped in, interpreting in English for us. Then Lorenzo began another soliloquy. As soon as she could, Deb again explained what he what he was saying. This back-and-forth went on for a few minutes, and we learned quite a bit. At some point, Massi returned from parking the car, and helped interpret, as well.

Massi pours the Prosecco for us to try at il Magnifico

Our hosts Deb and Massi arranged for this behind-the-scenes tour at the bakery. What a way to experience Siena, Italy! And with Prosecco!

Lorenzo’s father and uncle started the bakery in 1952. They’d traveled to Milan, where they got a little bit of sourdough starter from a bakery there. The starter is a lump of dough into which you mix ingredients and make a lot of dough. Before baking, you take some of the dough and reserve it, and it becomes your starter for the next day. This particular starter dates back over 200 years. Think of that. Bread in this line was being baked before the first shots of the U.S. Civil War.

Lorenzo shows us the "starter" in Siena, Italy

Lorenzo shows us the “Mother.” This is the piece of starter from which all of his future bread will be baked. This starter is part of a line that goes back more than 200 years.

Lorenzo is extremely careful to follow traditional methods and recipes. In fact, some of his recipes have been being made for 800 years. He uses nothing but traditional, organic grains in his products. And what he produces is incredible.

Panforte at il Magnifico, Siena, Italy

Panforte is a traditional holiday cake served in Siena.

He told us that his father taught him that it’s okay to spend a little more money for real ingredients. And Lorenzo does. Instead of buying egg yolk product for one cake recipe, he instead cracks open and separates 120 eggs. By hand. He does things the old way, and his over-the-top delicious products prove it’s the right way.

Biscotti, il Magnifico

Biscotti at il Magnifico bakery, Siena, Italy

As we continued our tour of the bakery,  Lorenzo suddenly disappeared. He came back with a larger -than-life smile and a plate of baked delectables. Then another. Soon, a worker brought a third, then a fourth plate.

Lorenzo and an employee sho off some of the many plates of food they brought for us to sample.

Lorenzo and an employee sho off some of the many plates of food they brought for us to sample.

Cups with a bottle of water appeared, then wine glasses and a bottle of Prosecco. Before we knew it, we were working our way through a sampler plate of pizzas, breads, cookies, and cheeses and we were loving every single bite.

Cheese and sandwich samples from il Magnifico

Two of the many trays of food we had to sample at il Magnifico.

I knew from Deb and Massi that we had several more stops to make on this tour, but I couldn’t keep myself from trying a little bit of everything. I knew our blog followers would want to know something about each of these baked goods, so I loosened my belt and kept sampling for the sake of research.

Eventually, we had to leave the bakery and our private foodie tour continued. But for now, let’s pause and reflect on the bakery and Deb and Massi’s well thought-out tour. Without their guidance and connections we never would have gotten to go behind the scenes and wouldn’t have thought to eat dessert first.

CLICK HERE to continue to part 2 of this story.


This is part one of a two-part series on our amazing foodie tour with Deb at Italy Unfiltered and her husband, Massi the Driver.

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Tuscan foodie tour with Deb at Italy Unfiltered and her husband, Massi the Driver.